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List of Courses
Course Number Course Name Short Description Long Description Tags
AA 100 Introduction to International Arts An interdisciplinary, multicultural introduction to the arts of the world. (3) (GA;IL)(BA)

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. The arts of the world can be simultaneously universal and unique. By conveying qualities of the human condition (mortality, love, lust, virtues, vices, etc.) the arts can be universal. However, the arts communicating these qualities can be as unique as the cultures that produced them. Consequently, the arts are representative of the commonality and diversity of the peoples of the world.A&A 100 will use the arts to consider similarities and differences among cultures. The primary objective of this course is to develop each student's ability to appreciate the arts from a variety of cultures. By equipping students with the skills to analyze works of art from other countries, the course will make them more receptive to the unfamiliar.The scope of this course will be open to all arts from all cultures but it cannot be comprehensive given how large a field of study this represents. The course will concentrate on but will not be limited to the visual arts, architecture, designed environments, theatre and music. It will not include all arts from all countries. Instead, case studies will be used to provide students with in depth examination of specific examples. Individual case studies will be selected based on qualities indicative of the culture of origin. Care will be given to selecting case studies representative of a wide variety of cultures. Effort will be made to include examples from Asia, Africa, Australia, South America and Europe.Case studies will be presented by guest lecturers and chosen from other resources on campus. Members of the College of Arts and Architecture faculty, international graduate students and visiting scholars will be invited to present examples from their expertise. Objects in the Palmer Museum Of Art, events at the Center for the Performing Arts and audio/visual/internet resources will also be used as sources for other case studies. Because the arts are central to this course, visual and audio experiences will be a major component.A&A 100 is the foundations course required by the International Arts Minor, but will also be available to other students not pursuing the minor as a General Education Arts (GA) and United States Cultures and International Cultures (US;IL) course.

A A 100 course in LionPath

visual arts
AA 121 Design Thinking and Creativity An introductory and multidisciplinary exploration of the theory, process, methods, and artifacts of design, achieved through an examination of ideas, examples, and applications. (3) (GA)(BA)

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. This course is an introductory, general education level course based on the premise that design is a fundamental human activity that everyone engages in one way or another. Design encompasses both the ability to imagine that which does not yet exist and to make it appear in concrete form. Design is a form of deliberate, considered action that seeks solutions to problems and creates useful and purposeful artifacts. Design is simultaneously used as a noun and a verb, and to describe a discipline and many fields of practice. Yet design remains essentially a black box to most people – its methods, processes, and components are mysterious, magical, and opaque. This course will turn the “black box” of design into a glass box.The course focuses on the relationship between ideas, tools, and artifacts in order to connect theory, practice, and outcomes. Using theory, practice, and artifacts from a range of design fields (including architecture, landscape architecture, product design, engineering, graphic design, environmental design, and design theory itself), the course will empower students to understand design from the perspective most useful to them and their work - ideas, application, and the things they encounter in the world. The course focuses on the kinds of problems, situations, and processes of thinking that are critical for designers, business professionals, engineers, humanists, social scientists and natural scientists.The course is divided into eight distinct units, allowing a thematic and comparative analysis of a breadth of design topics: What is Design?; Design Artifacts; Design Problems; Creativity; Design Thinking; Models of the Design Process; Design Action; and, Design Tools and Methods.By the end of the course, students will be equipped with the necessary knowledge and skills to understand and analyze the role of design in the world and to take action themselves, including:• the breadth of design in the world• the power and responsibility of design• a range of design artifacts• how designers think and work• what creativity is and what it entails• understandings of design, design thinking, and creativity across a breadth of disciplines• the parts of design problems• how the design process can be described• strategies and methods applicable to the stages of the design processThere are no prerequisites for this course. The course will serve as an introduction to fundamental ideas of design and complement design-focused courses in other departments/programs across the university. The course satisfies general education requirements for Arts (GA) requirements.

A A 121 course in LionPath

design
ARCH 100 Architecture and Ideas General introduction to world architecture, emphasizing the relationship between concepts, philosophies, values and ideologies in shaping the built environment. (3) (GA)(BA)

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. This course introduces architecture and urbanism for a general audience. It presents key concepts that have shaped the built environment, and provides an ongoing framework for evaluations of what makes a good building or city. The material discussed is taken from prehistory to the present, and encompasses both major works of architecture and consideration of common building types and contexts. Although monuments and philosophies from the Western tradition predominate, it brings in issues and examples of global scope as well. The course is structured around a set of themes. These include: how architecture embodies spiritual beliefs; affects private and community life; evolving definitions of the architect; and how ideas about aesthetics, technology, tradition, and other cultural forces shape buildings and influence diverse, often conflicting notions of what constitutes "good" architecture. The topics discussed will demonstrate multiple ways of understanding buildings and cities. Lectures and assigned readings explore significant illustrative structures, design theories, and the cultural and intellectual contexts in which they emerge. Through the lectures and readings students will become familiar with an extensive set of architectural works, as well as a wide range of influential architectural concepts, authors, and texts. ARCH 100 will ultimately help students analyze and judge buildings and the arguments about them critically, and better understand buildings and cities as ideologically charged artifacts that influentially structure human experience.

ARCH 100 course in LionPath

architecture & landscape architecture
ART 1 Introduction to Visual Arts  Introduction to the media, elements, function, making, and meaning of visual arts today and in diverse historical and cultural contexts.(3) (GA)(BA)

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. ART 001 is an introduction to the visual arts and is designed to meet the General Education Arts requirement. The course is offered every semester at University Park, for example, with an enrollment of 330. There are no prerequisites, and students are assumed to have little or no background in studying or making art. As a result of taking the course, students are able to look more closely and find ways to say what they see in the visual arts. They become familiar with a broad range of subject matter, style and medium, with the principles of design that organize works of art, and with changing historical and cultural contexts in which the arts have been made and understood. They also experience the challenge of making art themselves, and develop a more informed critical point of view. Because of the large number of students that may enroll, ART 001 is primarily a lecture course with a text. But students actively participate in individual and collaborative activities during class, including, for example, drawing a hand, pairing to exchange observations on a work of art, and arriving at consensus in groups of five in response to the question "What is art?" and then reporting back to the whole class. With fewer students, the number of art projects and the opportunity for extended discussion and studio critiques increases. Evaluation is based on tests, assignments and inclass activities. Tests measure students' ability to identify keys works and the style and subject matter of unknown related works, to apply their knowledge of media and visual vocabulary by labeling their sketches based on images shown during the test, and to answer multiple choice questions on the principles of design, media, meanings, and historical and cultural contexts in the production and experience of the visual arts. Every class meeting includes question and answer sessions. To encourage collaborative learning, at University Park, the multiple choice portion of the test is given twice during the test period, to allow students the second time to work together with open books to answer the questions. The assignments range from sketching and writing about works during a museum visit, to surveying architecture and sculpture in the community, to making a collage. There will also be opportunities to earn extra credit, for example by making a collage judged to be among the best by a jury of their peers, by attending and writing brief responses to public lectures and exhibitions, and for identifying useful resource links for the course website. Students rely on the course website and email for all information and announcements, including resources specifically prepared to supplement the text, such as summaries of class discussion of what to ask when looking at a work of art, lists of key terms and concepts, sample quizzes, and links related to lecture topics.

ART 001 course in LionPath

visual arts
ART 10 Introduction to Visual Studies  
Introduction to visual studies; pictorial space and the procinciples of visual organization. (3) (GA)(BA)

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. ART 010 is intended as a general survey course for non-majors consisting of images, ideas, and processes used in art making. As a studio offering, emphasis is placed on hands-on activities, which promote literacy and sensitivity to both two-dimensional and three-dimensional conventions in the visual arts. Students will experience the contextual influences of art, the visual languages and organizational systems of art, and the various studio processes of art. As well, slide presentations, studio visits and museum critiques will augment studio exercises to facilitate a greater awareness of the cultural context in which the visual arts function. As a general appreciation offering, emphasis is placed on active learning processes that involve students in basic studio materials and techniques. Students enrolled in this course will be required to participate in the following active learning components:1. Studio Assignments: a) Contextual influences of history and contemporary culture b) Visual languages and organizational systems related to the visual arts c) Studio processes with materials and techniques2. Creating a social and historical context for sculpture making through slide presentations, studio visits and museum critiques: a) Slide presentations: students will be asked to consider the concepts of their creative projects in relationship to works by historical and contemporary artists in order to understand the ways in which visual arts convey meaning. b) Studio visits: Students will visit the personal studios of local artists to learn how professional artists develop best practices as related to the three kinds of studio-based assignments outlined above. Additionally, they will explore and discuss with these artists the concepts and meanings expressed in their creative works. c) Museum critiques: Museum visits will enable students to learn how to engage and respond to actual works of art as compared with those that they experience as slide and printed representations. The role of museums and galleries in contemporary art practice will also be discussed. Grading and evaluation: Students' art projects will be evaluated according to the following criteria: 1) the uniqueness of the visual concepts developed in their studio assignments; 2) the strength of their visual compositions-their ability to communicate concepts clearly; 3) the quality of their craftsmanship-an effective use of materials and procedures and commitment to the studio assignments-the effort expended on each project; 4) Their willingness to participate in critique sessions-a thoughtful and informed interpretation of visual ideas in art works produced by them in class as well as those discussed during slide presentations, studio visits, and museum critiques. Since the School of Visual Arts now requires a portfolio review for Visual Arts majors to enroll in studio courses, ART 010 provides an opportunity for non-art majors to do studio work in conjunction with an exploration of art concepts.

ART 010  course in LionPath

visual arts
ART 20 Introduction to Drawing Introductory experience in making of art through drawing media; designed for non-majors seeking general overview of studio practice. (3) (GA)(BA)

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. ART 020 is intended as a general survey of the art of drawing for non-majors. As a studio offering, emphasis is placed on hands-on studio activities, which promote visual literacy and on the various conventions used in drawing. Students will be given the opportunity to briefly explore many of the traditional materials of drawing, including pencil, charcoal, conte, ink and ink wash, pastel, as well as experimental tools. As well, slide presentations, studio visits and museum critiques will augment studio exercises to facilitate a greater awareness of the cultural context in which drawing functions. As a general appreciation offering, emphasis is placed on active learning processes that involve students in basic studio materials and techniques. Since the School of Visual Arts now requires a portfolio review for Visual Arts majors to enroll in studio courses, ART 020 provides an opportunity for non-art majors to do studio work in conjunction with an exploration of art concepts.

ART 020 course in LionPath

visual arts
ART 122 Commentary on Art An introduction to verbal commentary, both oral and written, about art.  The development of critical and expressive skills given emphasis. (3) ART 122 course in LionPath visual arts
ART 201 Intro to Digital Arts: Computer Graphics A course introducing digital art, design, and new media concepts using graphic applications on the computer. (3)

This is a course in which the students work with raster graphic, vector graphics and text layout programs. The purpose of the course is to give an introduction to how computer hardware and software can be used to produce works of art and design, which can be exhibited electronically, and also in print. It provides the first step for students interested in realizing their artwork using computers to develop and realize it.

ART 201 course in LionPath

visual arts
ART 202 Computer 3-Dimensional Modeling and Rendering A studio course introducing the student to 3-D computer modeling and rendering applications. (3) ART 203 course in LionPath visual arts
ART 203 The Art of Web Design
This course will focus on utilizing graphic formats ideal for web-based work and designing with web standards. (3)

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements .ART 203 is a 200-level course for the New Media area of concentration in the School of Visual Arts, and will focus on working with different graphic formats, both bitmap and vector based, which work on the web and on designing with web standards to assure accessibility and effective communication of information in a variety of forms.This course will teach how to meet the present government standards for accessibility by the disabled and the technical and accessibility standards recommended by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The web as a global communication medium will be discussed, with special consideration given to the presentation of sites using languages other than English.The course will also emphasize the various uses of images to present information in different ways, in a variety of formats - gif, jpg, png, swf and svg - to learn which is the most effective for the particular information being presented. The use of text and typography for communication and how these can make artwork on the web more effective will also be examined.Clarity and flexibility of art and design, ease of use and creating web-optimized files that download quickly will be other subjects of concern.There will also be examples and discussion of artists and designers currently using the web, how communication on the web can work well, how it can work badly and how it can be abused.

ART 203 course in LionPath

visual arts
ART 211Y Introduction to Digital Art and Design Criticism An introduction to the language, aesthetics, and cultural impacts of digital art and design in contemporary society. (3) ART 211Y course in LionPath visual arts
ARTH 111 Ancient to Medieval Art Survey of Ancient Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Early Medieval, Romanesque, and Gothic art, with an emphasis on sculpture and painting. (3) (GA;IL)(BA)

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. This course is an introduction to Western art before the Renaissance, from ca. 25,000 BCE to AD 1423. The topics covered in this course include prehistoric art in Europe; art of the Near East and Egypt; Aegean art; Greek and Roman art; Early Christian, Jewish, Islamic and Byzantine art; and Medieval art including Romanesque and Gothic developments. The course is designed to meet two principal goals. The first is to increase students' powers of visual analysis and to help them build a critical vocabulary for discussing an art object's medium, composition, style, and iconography. The second is to foster an understanding of the deep implication of the visual arts in their social and cultural contexts. The course therefore involves significant material relating to political, economic and religious issues. It investigates problems in patronage, function, reception and censorship. It considers such intra- and cross-cultural issues as representations of gender and the incorporation of non-European art forms into the Western tradition. Typical requirements include exams and a paper. As a general education course in the arts, this course provides an introduction to Ancient through Medieval art to a student of any major. This course has no prerequisite and presumes no prior exposure to art history. As a course in the Art History major, it teaches students both the common vocabulary of the field and the outlines of the field that form the foundation for future study. Art History 111 serves as a companion course to Art History 112, which deals with art from the Renaissance to Modern Times. Art History 111 also complements Art History 201, "Ancient to Medieval Architecture."

ARTH 111 course in LionPath

art history
ARTH 112 Renaissance to Modern Art Survey of Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Romantic, Modern, and Contemporary art, with an emphasis on painting, sculpture, and graphic arts. (3) (GA;IL)(BA)

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. Art History 112 provides an introduction to the history of art in the European tradition from the early Renaissance (ca. 1300) to the present. Areas covered include Early and High Renaissance Italian art; Northern Renaissance art; Baroque art of Italy, Spain, France and the Netherlands; and subsequent artistic movements emphasizing the Rococo, Neo-Classicism, Realism, Impressionism and Modernist movements from Fauvism through Abstract Expressionism to Contemporary. The course is designed to meet two principal goals. The first is to increase students' powers of visual analysis and to help them build a critical vocabulary for discussing an art object's medium, composition, style, and iconography. The second is to foster an understanding of the deep implication of the visual arts in their social and cultural contexts, both historical and contemporary. The course therefore involves significant material relating to political, economic and religious issues. It investigates problems in patronage, function, reception and censorship. It considers such intra- and cross-cultural issues as representations of gender and the incorporation of non-European art forms into the Western tradition. Requirements typically include examinations combining short answer and essay questions, and at least one writing assignment. As a general education course in the arts, this course provides an introduction to Renaissance through modern art for a student in any major. It has no prerequisite and presumes no prior exposure to art history. It will teach students majoring in Art History both the common vocabulary of the field and the outlines of the field that form the foundation for future study. Art History 112 serves a companion course to Art History 111, which examines Western art from Antiquity through the Middle Ages. Art History 112 also complements Art History 202, "Renaissance to Modem Architecture."

ART 122 course in LionPath

art history
GD 100 Introduction to Graphic Design
A beginning level graphic design course.  Instruction touches on the practice, theories, history and processes of the graphic design industry. (3) (GA)GD 100 (GA) 

This course is a beginning level graphic design course. Instruction touches on the practice, history, theories, and analysis of the design industry. This course places emphasis on problem solving and observing design, while developing intuition and creativity. Projects focus on the process of defining the parameters of a design problem, observing examples within the design industry, and critically evaluating examples of effective and ineffective design.The course will help students to:1. Understand the graphic design industry and the responsibilities of the profession.2. Develop an appreciation for the practice of design.3. Begin to develop the ability to define and solve problems.4. Increase their knowledge of the history of graphic design and typography.5. Refine their conceptual skills.6. Learn and understand the vernacular of the industry.Students will be quizzed on terminology and important facts provided in the readings.Grading:1. Grades will be calculated by quizzes, which will be given throughout the semester. Quizzes will be based on topics and material provided online. 60% of the final course grade will be based on quizzes.2. Participation in online discussion forums is required. Students will be expected to post comments and responses to an online forum. 20% of the final grade will be based on participation within these forums.3. Students will be expected to research various examples of design in commercial and non-commercial applications, upload examples, comment on designs, and engage in discussions of effective and ineffective use. Emphasis will be placed on writing skills as part of the evaluation 20% of the final grade will be based on project assignments in design evaluation.

GD 100 course in LionPath

design
LARCH 60 History of Design on the Land (3) (GA)(BA) A survey of the historical development of outdoor space in relationship to allied arts from early beginnings to this century.

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. LARCH 060 is an introductory survey course of the historical development of designed outdoor space in relationship to the allied arts from early beginnings to present day. Although the profession of architecture was not named until 1858, with the award-winning design of Central Park by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, the art of design on the land has been practiced since the beginning of time. It is the creation of human environments, inevitably expressing the creator's perception of the relationship between humanity and nature.As with all art, the design of outdoor spaces reveals a culture's beliefs, values, and aspirations. If one studies design in different cultures and time periods, one can learn a great deal about that society. One can also begin to see history holistically, to detect trends, to relate yesterday to today, and to question the present and future. In the course we explore the outdoor spatial designs of history, with emphasis upon what these designs reveal about cultural attitudes toward nature, humanity and art. While we will address middle and far-eastern landscapes, the course focuses upon western civilizations with the second half focusing on American landscapes.The objective of this course is to present a concise analysis of the design of outdoor space with special emphasis on American design from 1800 to date. It is hoped that students will gain an increased awareness of landscape architecture as an art, and of their own built environment as a product of cultural values.Grades are based upon three examinations: two during the course and one during final exam period. Each examination is worth 33 1/3% of your final grade. Each exam will consist mostly of multiple-choice questions some of which may be based on slides; there may also be short answer questions. The specific format will be announced prior to each exam. Both lecture content and reading packet material will be covered on the exams. Computer tutorials are available and designed to aid in your understanding of the reading packet. As well, the lectures are taped and are available for review through the University's Classroom Recording unit. To further aid you in understanding course content, a study guide will be posted every week at the web address.

LARCH 060 course in LionPath

architecture & landscape architecture
MUSIC 4 Film Music An introductory examination of music's role in Hollywood narrative film from the classic era (1930s and 1940s) to the present. (3) (GA)

The course examines the role of music in narrative film, the premier art form of the twentieth century. The popularity, significance, and value of film art would not be what it is today if music had not become an integral--indeed, indispensable--part of motion pictures from the outset. Preliminary objectives will include basic musical information (the fundamental elements of music; the broad stylistic eras of western music and their associated characteristics; the culturally encoded language of tonal music and associated musical meaning) and the main techniques of narrative film. The main objectives of the course are: to identify and recognize the principles of nondiegetic music in narrative film; to identify and recognize the purpose and functions of music in narrative film; to recognize some of the historic eras/genres/trends in Hollywood film making; to identify and recognize selected films, directors and composers; to analyze and articulate the role of music in a given scene and in a given film; and to recognize underlying assumptions and values of the culture conveyed through the diegesis. These objectives will be met by addressing such questions as: What are the underlying principles of music in film? What are the functions of music/sound within a particular scene and how does it achieve those functions? What do we see of what we hear, and what do we hear of what we see--and why? What secrets does music tell? To what extent does music influence--even control-- our interpretation of a film? More broadly, to what extent do films reflect our culture, past and present--our interests, our values? Evaluation methods will include quizzes, exams, discussion boards, and a final paper. The course will be available for GA credit. It will not satisfy any requirements for the major or minor in music. The films and film excerpts will be made available to the students online.

MUSIC 004 course in LionPath

music
MUSIC 7 Evolution of Jazz Study of the origins and development of jazz as an art form. (3) (GA;US)(BA)

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. Evolution of Jazz is a course designed to examine the historical and sociological of the American art form - jazz. This general education course is for non-majors. The material covered in this course begins with the precursors to jazz emphasizes the African musical traditions and white American (initially European) influences that have shaped jazz as an American art form. This is followed by period studies of the various jazz styles: New Orleans Dixie, Chicago Style Dixieland, Swing, Be-Bop, Cool, Hard Bop, Free Jazz, Fusion Jazz, Neo Bop, Latin Jazz, and New Age. The various jazz styles are examined from musical, sociological and economical perspectives. The major innovators and performers are identified and studied. As new styles are presented, a careful comparison to the previous style is done to help with classification. The primary objectives of the course are to create a greater appreciation for jazz music by providing knowledge about the intercultural development of jazz in America, by developing critical listening skills, and exposing students to the music representing various eras and performers of this music. A major component of the course is listening. Early in the course listening skills are taught. Students learn how to recognize certain instruments, hear the various sections within a group, and identify forms. Several written reviews of recorded and live jazz performances are required. Listening is also a part of each examination. This course is offered each fall, spring, and summer (one section each session) with an average enrollment of 40 each session.

MUSIC 007 course in LionPath

music
MUSIC 8 Rudiments of Music Introduction to the elements of music: notation, scales, meter, rhythm, intervals; basic chord structure. (3) (GA)(BA)

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. Learning the rudiments of music can be compared to the learning of a language. Students must learn to hear melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic patterns (audiation) before they sing, play or write in notation. In this introductory class, students are introduced to melodic, harmonic and rhythmic patterns by imitating the instructor who establishes these patterns at the piano, or by singing or as in the case of rhythm by striking a drum head. Eventually students will take turns “tossing” these patterns to teach other. Basic skills of improvisation can also be taught at this level of audiation by having students expand upon the basic patterns. As a result of these creative and aesthetic experiences, students will be able to translate the audiation of patterns into musical notation - moving from the smallest unit of a rhythmic motive towards the creation of a coherent rhythmic phrase. Similarly, at the melodic level, the student will begin with intervallic patterns and move towards the creation of a coherent melodic phrase. Intervals are then combined vertically to form harmonies. At the next stage of learning, students will learn to identify and to write that which they are hearing in dictation. This course in “musical literacy” enables students: (1) to deepen their appreciation of music (2) to begin studying a musical instrument and (3) to enter the rigorous study of music theory required of music majors.

MUSIC 008 course in LionPath

music
MUSIC 9 Introduction to World Musics An overview of the music of India, China, Japan, Indonesia, Africa, and the Middle East.  (3) (GA;IL)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. MUSIC 009 is a course that explores world cultures through their music. The course begins with an overview of ways to examine world music as a cultural phenomenon. The goal of this section is to help students move beyond their preconceived understanding of music in order to open their minds and ears to a wide variety of music through a selection of case studies, including, but not limited to, the music of the Celtic nations, the African continent, West Asia (the Middle East), India, Indonesia, Japan, and the Native American culture groups. The music of these cultures is explored both as a product and reflection of culture and as an aesthetic art form. Through this approach students not only develop a basic fluency in the characteristics of selected world musics, but also gain a broader understanding of the general classifications and geographical divisions of world music and the ways in which music relates to and is a part of all world cultures. Two primary methods of evaluation are used. Four examinations test the students' understanding of the material. Two assigned reaction/research papers provide students with the opportunity to explore particular types of music in greater depth, examining both the music itself and the social context in which it is found. These papers require students a) to think actively about contemporary musical developments around the world, including how they are affected by current socio-political events and cultural trends; and b) to utilize resources available in the university library as a way of exploring these developments. World musics are best understood when students engage in the music and in discussions of the music and culture; thus there is also a class participation/discussion component for the purposes of evaluation. The course requires a technology classroom equipped with a sound system, television/VCR, and piano.

MUSIC 009 course in LionPath

music
MUSIC 11 Under the Hood: How Classical Music Works An introductory examination of classical music, drawing together aspects of theory and repertoire to understand how the music works. (GA)

MUSIC 011 course in LionPath

music
MUSIC 109 The Music of the Beatles This course will consider the music of the Beatles by examining how John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison developed as songwriters.

MUSIC 109 course in LionPath

music, pop culture
THEA 105 Introduction to Theatre An introduction and overview of the history, craft, and art of the theatre to foster an informed appreciation of theatrical events.  This course is an alternate to THEA 100. (3) (GA) (BA)  This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements.This course will introduce students to the art and craft of theatrical production. Students will learn about plays, playwrights, major eras and styles of theatrical production, the analysis of scripts, genres of dramatic literature, and the personnel involved in the production of plays.

THEA 105 course in LionPath

theatre
THEA 112 Introduction to Musical Theatre A survey of music theatre as an art form. (GA)

THEA 112 course in LionPath

theatre